Family Portraiture with Pacheanne Anderson and Bernice Mulenga

  • Whitechapel Gallery Siobhan Davies Youth Programme High Res-116 copy

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11 June, 11am-4pm

Creative Studio

Monday Closed
Tuesday 11am–6pm
Wednesday 11am–6pm
Thursday 11am–9pm
Friday 11am–6pm
Saturday 11am–6pm
Sunday 11am–6pm

Workshop

A workshop for LGBTQ+ young people exploring and contributing to We Get To Choose Our Family, a new exhibition at Whitechapel Gallery all about chosen families and their importance to members of the LGBTQ+ community.

Facilitated by Pacheanne Anderson and multidisciplinary artist Bernice Mulenga, this one-day workshop will delve into the themes and process behind the exhibition and invite you to create your own responses. Collaboratively we will think about ideas of family portraits, and work together to devise and photograph some original family portraiture.


This free event is open to young people aged 15-24, who identify as LGBTQ+. Find out more about our Youth Programme and our youth collective Duchamp & Sons here.

Please email Amelia Oakley, Curator: Youth Programmes on duchampandsons@whitechapelgallery.org if you have any questions or access requirements you would like to discuss ahead of this event.

About Pacheanne Anderson

Pacheanne Anderson is a published writer, curator and creative consultant who. Their practice prioritises the voice and careers of queer, Black, POC & British artists. He has just been appointed curatorial director at The Ledward Centre with arts organisation SEAS Brighton, in addition to running an Arts & Culture programme with Soho House & Friends called Art in* that highlights black British creative talent.

 

Bernice Mulenga

Bernice Mulenga is a multidisciplinary artist, who prioritizes the use of analogue processes in their work. They have a knack in archiving, documenting and asking questions. Their work focuses on their community and the experiences within it—most notably found in their ongoing photo series #friendsonfilm. Mulenga’s work also explores reoccurring themes surrounding their identity, sexuality, grief, family, and Congolese culture.


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