Big Ideas: Astrida Neimanis

  • Astrida, the river ends

    Photo by Lucy Parakhina from A River Ends as the Ocean: Walk the Tide Out, (Aunty Rhonda Dixon Grovenor, Clare Britton, Astrida Neimanis, 2021.

Thu 22 Apr, 7pm

Whitechapel Gallery Online

Monday Closed
Tuesday 11am–6pm
Wednesday 11am–6pm
Thursday 11am–6pm
Friday 11am–6pm
Saturday 11am–6pm
Sunday 11am–6pm

Access Information

Talk

Working at the intersection of feminism and environmental studies, Astrida Neimanis is the leading figure of ‘hydrofeminist’ thought. Her ideas on weathering, the non-human and ‘wet matter’ are explored in books including Bodies of Water (2017) and have had a profound impact on how we can think about water anew. Hydrofeminism emphasises a radical collectivity – if we are all bodies of water then we are connected to the watery planet through a fluid continuum.

In this lecture, Neimanis thinks athwart Eileen Agar’s own practice of collage, the torquing of scale, and the juxtaposition of unrelated things. Sifting through the flotsam and jetsam of climate catastrophe, what new ways of relating might emerge from the wreckage? 

This event is part of the season Ways of Knowing: Water / Fluidity

Supported by the Stanley Picker Trust. 

About Astrida Neimanis

Astrida Neimanis is a writer & cultural theorist working at the intersection of feminism and environmental change. Her research focuses on bodies, water, and weather, and how they can help us reimagine justice, care, responsibility and relation in the time of climate catastrophe. Her most recent book, Bodies of Water: Posthuman Feminist Phenomenology is a call for humans to examine our relationships to oceans, watersheds, and other aquatic life forms from the perspective of our own primarily watery bodies, and our ecological, poetic, and political connections to other bodies of water.  Her work has been featured at the Shanghai Biennale 2021, RIBOCA 2020, the Lofoten Biennale 2019, and as part of many other artistic, academic, and community events and publications. Astrida recently joined UBC Okanagan on unceded Syilx and Okanagan lands, in Kelowna BC, Canada.