What We Shared

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Thur 9 June, 7pm

Zilkha Auditorium

Monday Closed
Tuesday 11am–6pm
Wednesday 11am–6pm
Thursday 11am–9pm
Friday 11am–6pm
Saturday 11am–6pm
Sunday 11am–6pm

Access Information

What We Shared

Seven inhabitants of a de facto state on the Black Sea unfurl a web of stories about loss and displacement through the re-imaginings of dreams and memories of the 1992-93 war in Abkhazia. To question the unstable distinction between fact and fiction, these re-imaginings are interwoven with auto-fictional narration and archival materials that have been processed through an AI technology. The Black Sea permeating the film’s world acts as a metaphor of both an idyllic holiday destination of utopian happiness; as well as a perilous force, a place of conspiracy and death. What We Shared employs emotive soundscape and imagery to produce a sensory reflection on artistic practice as a powerful binding force and an act of resistance to dominant power structures.

Filmmaker’s Statement

In What We Shared we collectively, creatively interpreted dreams and memories that may not otherwise be perceived or even conceived. I wanted to show that the 1992-93 Abkhaz-Georgian war is not a history but a contemporary reality as the trauma caused by it passes onto younger generations.

What We Shared engages with memory, intergenerational trauma, war and displacement and in doing so it demonstrates that manoeuvring between all these subjects requires subtlety and at times, fiction.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Kamila Kuc.

About Kamila Kuc

Kamila Kuc‘s hybrid works explore the transformative potential of apparatuses, dreams and memories in the creation of societal myths and narratives. Of particular interest to her practice are stories that subvert dominant narratives of history, especially those relating to post-Soviet identities. What We Shared is her first feature film which premiered at the 65th BFI London Film Festival and was described as one of ‘the finest examples of UK filmmaking’ by Festival Scope.